Areca Palm

Areca Palm

Areca Palm (Chrysalidocarpus lutescens)
The Areca Palm is a wonderful plant that can bring the beautiful green of the outdoors inside your home creating your own indoor tropical forest. Areca Palm can be used to adorn your surrounding and placed in front of a window the Areca Palm instantly creates a living privacy screen which by nature gracefully fans out. I use several palms across my patio door for this very purpose.

The striking feather-like green fronds radiate from several trunks and the plant will grow wider before it grows taller. These characteristic further make the Areca Palm the perfect choice for home décor. Especially if you have a large empty area that you need to fill with something that is eye catching or a window that needs privacy screening.

Arecas’ do not require bright direct sunlight. They thrive best in indirect light. The plant can be placed in an eastward window. As the sun rises in the east and sets in the west an eastward window provides morning sun and evening shade. I also adjust the vertical blinds so that the plants can receive the right amount of light. Too much direct sunlight may burn the fronds. Cut away yellow or dead fronds at their base.

I give my Areca Palms a heavy watering once a week and an occasional misting if the plants become dull looking.

On a final note remember that living with houseplants of any variety not only beautifies your surrounding but provide a natural source of cleaner air within your home. You don’t have to wait for spring to see the loveliness of green or spectacular colors. The Areca Palm is a plant of choice to enhance your home decor and provide you with years of aesthetic appeal. Start potting today and fill your home with a breath taking showcase of beauty.

If you have any questions please click on the comment area and I will get back to you as soon as possible.

8 Comments

8 thoughts on “Areca Palm

  1. I love these palms but they never survive with me. I have just treated myself to a huge one so really want to make sure i keep this one healthy – it is stunning. In the past the leaves seem to go crisp and brittle, followed by discolouration of the tips that eventually spreads and the whole leaf and stem dulls and dies.
    I have put my new palm in my conservatory which is very cool/cold this time of year. I do have blinds so I can take away some of the direct light it is currently getting and I only water about once a week this time of year and add baby bio in the warmer months to each watering.
    I have tried misting but without it helping to save my palms as I thought they looked dried out. I do have a good quality leaf shine spray which I have been advised to use very sparingly – about once every 3-6 months.
    Is there anything you can tell from i’ve told you that I am doing wrong? Will I have more success with my new palm due to its size and esablished?

    • Artificially recreating the plant’s natural habitat of a humid tropical forest found in parts of Southeast Asia would result in a greater success story for houseplant lovers. However, for the majority of us this would be a struggle thus we continue with our labor of love and loss.

      I would stuggest that whatever you did with the Areca Palms that you lost then do the opposite with this new plant. It may take some effort on your part but trial and error is the key to success. Compared to most houseplants the Areca Palm is relative inexpensive which provides some opportunity for expermenting. The atmosphere within our homes are all different. If you kept the other palms moist all the time then try allowing this one’s soil to get near dry before watering.

      Browning of Areca Palm frond tips appear to be a natural aptitude of this lush tropical plant. Trimming the brown tips will only result in a dead frond which will need to be removed or trimed away.

      Keep the plant away from direct sunlight, at least 4 to 6 feet, to prevent burning of the fonds and loss of moisture. Placing the Areca palm in a corner near the window has been my longest success rate. The plant has occupied this particular corner for over two years and still appears healthy and thriving. This corner receives only indirect low light and the soil is allowed to dry before watering, about every 3 weeks.

      A key note here is that if the plant is doing well were it is located then do not move it. It is obviously receiving the right amount of light and humidity that it needs to survive.

      The Areca Palm is heaven to spider mites with all those feathery fronds to weave within. Check for spider webs often. I personally do not use chemicals in my home. I simply remove the infected frond and dispose of it. Usually this gets rid of the spider mite which is like most spiders perfer a “home” spot to live in.

      The soapy water theory is another method which I avoid. Knowing that soap is a chemical and will end up in the soil with the possibility of further damaging or killing the plant. Remember to stick to the natural habitat as much as possible, chemicals, and fertilizers are not part of their habitat.
      Plant shine is another product which I refrain from. I view it in comparison to waxing your furniture. Plants need to “breath” in order to survive. Waxing your plants inhibits their ability to do so and can result in damage or loss of life. Outdoor plants are washed to a natural shine by rain or the garden hose. Indoor dust can be removed by misting or placing the potted plant in the shower.

      On a finally note, as all living things plants have a life expectancy depending on the species and a multitude of variables. The larger Areca Palms will by nature have a shorter life expectancy. They are nearing their seasons end and gardening centers usually mark them down to rock bottom prices. Therefore, relax and enjoy the beauty of your plant while it is in its glory stages. When it withers away after you have provided tender loving care do not stress, replace it.

  2. I am not sure exactly what a frond is. Therefore, I’m not sure where to cut it when/if it needs to be cut. Please explain where I would cut the frond.

    Thanks.

    • A frond is similar to a branch on a tree, here we speak of a large steam leaf. If it become brown if needs to cut away as near to the plant trunk as possible.

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